Open Space advocates claim new state law makes Park Hill Golf Course land off-limits to commercial, residential development

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October 21, 2019

Open Space advocates claim new state law makes Park Hill Golf Course land off- limits to commercial, residential development.

Please see the following letter to City Council which includes a statement by Jessica E. Jay. Jessica E Jay has been practicing land conservation law for 21 years. She represents landowners and easement holders including statewide, regional and local land trusts.

Please see the entire letter here

Denver Post Mayorial Forum Audio Portion

Listen to the Forum here. Video is not available but we thank The Denver Post for sharing the audible portion. The first question deals with Park Hill Golf Course

https://soundcloud.com/denverpost/denver-mayoral-debate-the-candidates-address-the-issues-ahead-of-mays-election

Park Hill Golf Club operator fires off second lawsuit, this time at city over construction

Business Den
Aaron Kremer March 27, 2019

ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE
The operator of the now-closed Park Hill Golf Club this week sued the City of Denver, asking a court to prevent construction work affecting four holes until an agreement is in place regarding how the operator will be compensated for expenses related to the course closing.

Texas-based golf course operator Arcis Golf, whose lease on the 155-acre course runs through 2023 and makes the company responsible for maintaining the property, claims in the lawsuit that it doesn’t currently have such an agreement with either the city or Clayton Early Learning, the golf course owner.

The city’s Department of Public Works has fenced off around 35 acres of the golf course on the northern end of the course — about four holes — and is building a flood mitigation holding area, according to the lawsuit. The course closed at the end of 2018 because of the work.

“Neither the city nor Clayton has given us any indication of how our costs for the next few years will be reimbursed while the course is closed,” said Scott Siddons, Arcis’ general counsel. “The only way to force the issue is to file a reverse condemnation lawsuit.”

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