A Life Or Death Situation – A Letter From Kim Morse

From K Morse
To CdeBaca, Candi – CC XA1404 Member Denver City Council Candi.CdeBaca@denvergov.org, amanda.sawyer@denvergov.org amanda.sawyer@denvergov.org, amanda.sandoval@denvergov.org amanda.sandoval@denvergov.org, chris.hinds@denvergov.org chris.hinds@denvergov.org, Kashmann, Paul J. – City Council Paul.Kashmann@denvergov.org, Herndon, Christopher J. – City Council District 8 Christopher.Herndon@denvergov.org, ortegaatlarge@denvergov.org ortegaatlarge@denvergov.org, Deborah Ortega deborahortega@icloud.com, Kniech, Robin L. – City Council Robin.Kniech@denvergov.org, stacie.gilmore@denvergov.org stacie.gilmore@denvergov.org, kevin.flynn@denvergov.org kevin.flynn@denvergov.org, jolon.clark@denvergov.org jolon.clark@denvergov.org, kendra.black@denvergov.org kendra.black@denvergov.org, jamie.torres@denvergov.org jamie.torres@denvergov.org

 

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Council Representatives,
You’re more than likely familiar with the statement pictured above.
Selling off open space may not seem like a life or death situation to you but it is just one more step in that direction for all life forms that exist today.  News outlets reported last week that July 2019 was the hottest on record.  Our air and water quality is increasingly compromised by human activities.  We loses countless species (mammals, birds, insects, etc.) each year through extinction due to human activities, including encroachment on their habitat, pollution and the resulting warming of our planet.
Our increasing landmass of asphalt and concrete contributes to local warming, which contributes to the need to use more fossil fuel to cool our homes, cars, offices, etc., not to mention lost productivity, health issues and more.  I encourage you to step outside of the City and County and head across the street to the greenery of Civic Center Park on a 90+ degree day. Take in the very noticeable difference in temperature between the streetscape you’ll cross on your way to the park and the park itself. It’s dramatic.  We need more trees, plants and other natural landscape, not less.
It is incumbent on each and every one of you to do what you can to Stop Park Hill Golf Course from being covered in asphalt and concrete.  Let’s not be shortsighted here and think about our own personal interests in open space or financial gain today.  Let’s think about the future that we want to leave for our children and their children. Continue reading

What Is Clayton Early Learning and Why Does It Own Park Hill Golf Club?

Parks and open-space advocates — including former Denver mayor Wellington Webb — were dismayed to learn that the now-shuttered Park Hill Golf Club will be sold to developers. The current owner is set to close a deal with Westside Investment Partners on July 11.

Neither side has announced particular development plans. The deal is wrapped up in a mess of pending litigation between the city and golf club operator Arcis Golf, and the land is currently subject to a conservation easement agreed to in 1997 that prohibits development. Still, advocates fear that the move could turn 155 acres of rolling green grass into housing complexes, office buildings and retail space.

The land that makes up Park Hill Golf Club is part of the George W. Clayton Trust, which is managed by Clayton Early Learning — a nonprofit that isn’t in the business of golf, open space or real estate, but serves low-income children and is a well-regarded preschool and educational research institute. And it’s on the hunt for more funds.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE

History of Clayton Campus and Why It Is Selling Park Hill Golf Club _ Westword

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