City of Denver reveals results of Park Hill Golf Course survey

Critics: survey is deceptive and pushes agenda

Channel 7 News, Russell Haythorn May 18 2021

 

DENVER — A serene-looking green space at East 35th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard in Denver makes up the 200-acre Park Hill Golf Course. The open space is sparking intense debate in Denver.

A developer snatched up Park Hill Golf Course in 2019.

Under current rules, it is limited to operating as an 18-hole golf course. But now, the city is asking neighbors if they want to keep it as a golf course or change things up. The City of Denver worked with a market research firm to survey neighbors.

On Tuesday, they released the results of that survey. Four out of five respondents said they want mixed use, including 85% who were in favor of a grocery store, 73% for a park and 67% for affordable housing.

Neighbors shared their thoughts, but some argue their thoughts were influenced by the survey.

“There are obviously many, many legitimate polls and surveys out there and for those, usually, you don’t see loaded questions,” said Ali Besharat, a University of Denver marketing and consumer insight expert.

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SOS Denver Press Conference Feb 8 2021

DENVER, CO (February 8, 2021) Save Open Space Denver (“SOS Denver”), the grassroots community organization that has been working for over four years on issues related to the future of the Park Hill Golf Course land, will hold a virtual press conference on Monday morning February 8th, from 10:30​ to 11:00 a.m. The Zoom meeting will expose some of the very important concerns facing the future of the Park Hill Golf Course land and its conservation easement. The meeting will also address issues with the way in which the City is proceeding regarding the land by launching this “visioning” and planning effort. SOS Denver has presented these concerns in writing to Mayor Hancock and his administration today, with copies to Denver City Council members. A copy of this letter will be released to press via email Monday morning. The main concerns include: • Why is the City proceeding with a “visioning” and planning process for development on land that is legally protected from development by a conservation easement? • If the City has plans to lift the easement to allow development, how do they plan to do this in compliance with the Colorado conservation easement statute? • If this planning process goes forward, what, if anything, can be done to neutralize the inherent bias of a developer-driven process, orchestrated to produce a pro-development outcome for the real estate developer landowner? Tony Pigford and Woody Garnsey from SOS Denver will be on hand to present the latest on this fight to protect this critical open space and will be available to take questions.